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Welcome to Gallery Ten – Part One

We would like to let everyone know that Gallery Ten is now up. Highlighted by 50 different early hunting and fishing licenses issued by New Mexico, starting with their first Hunter’s License as a territory in 1909 and continuing through the end of World War Two (see Figure 1), it can be reached by clicking on Galleries beneath the Home page banner, then clicking on “Gallery Ten”.

 

 

Figure 1. 1938-39 New Mexico $5.00 (Resident General Hunting and Fishing) License with RW5 affixed.

 

 

Once there, you will find an introduction for each series. After reading the introductions, click on the images above them to enter the individual galleries. Once inside the individual galleries, you have several options for viewing.

If you click on a thumbnail the image will expand in size. From there, you can navigate through the galleries by using the forward and back arrows located at the right and left sides of your screen; you may also choose to click on the slide show symbol located at the lower right of the image (it looks like a triangle facing right). Once the slide show is running, the symbol turns into a pause button.

You may also choose to enter full screen mode by clicking on the symbol located at the upper left of the image (it looks like four arrows extending out in different directions). To get back to the thumbs, click on the “x” at the upper right of the image or click on the page outside the image (see Figure 2).

 

 

Figure 2. Screenshot of a 1910 Territory of New Mexico License from Gallery Ten, enlarged image showing the command functions located at the sides and in three corners.

 

 

Maryland Chesapeake Bay Fishing Stamps

The first gallery consists of the stamps Maryland required sportsmen to purchase prior to fishing on the tidal waters of the Chesapeake Bay. These were issued from 1985 through 1996. Other types of stamps were issued for fishing on non tidal (fresh) waters. These were located inland and included rivers, streams and ponds. The most common of these were the long series of stamps required for fishing on designated trout streams starting in 1963.

Most fish and game collectors are familiar with the pictorial Chesapeake Bay Sport Fishing Stamps; three different stamps were issued each year starting in 1985 and ending in 1992. If a sportsman had not already purchased a stamp for non tidal waters, they could choose between a $5.00 stamp good for the entire season (see Figure 3) or a $2.00 stamp good for three consecutive days. Relatively few $2.00 stamps were sold and the first one (1985) is especially sought after.

 

 

Figure 3. 1985 $5.00 Maryland Chesapeake Bay Sport Fishing Stamp used on license.

 

 

If a sportsman had already purchased a stamp for non tidal waters, they could pay an additional $2.50 and obtain a seasonal Chesapeake Bay Sport Fishing Stamp – basically for half price. Therefore, more of the $2.50 stamps were sold than the other two combined (see Figure 4).

 

 

Figure 4. 1986 $2.50 Chesapeake Bay Sport Fishing Stamp used on license with stamps for non tidal waters.

 

 

Many fish and game collectors, however, may not be aware that Maryland also issued an additional Chesapeake Bay Sport Fishing Stamp that was non pictorial. The $25.00 stamp could only be purchased by boat owners that were not for hire.

The Maryland Chesapeake Bay Sport Fishing Stamps for Pleasure Boats were discovered by Sylvia Tompkins. Sylvia was an advanced collector who was working at the Pentagon in the 1980s and she was especially interested in the fish and game stamps issued by the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia.

For the first several years, the self-adhesive license stamps were issued together with a separate pair of self-adhesive Pleasure Boat stickers. The latter were required to be placed on each side of the vessel (see Figures 5 and 6). By 1991, the license stamp and stickers were issued se-tenant on the same piece of backing paper. The Pleasure Boat Stamp series was discontinued following the 1996 season.

 

 

Figure 5. 1986 Maryland License with Chesapeake Bay Pleasure Boat Stamp affixed, issued to Sylvia Tompkins.

 

 

Figure 6. 1986 Maryland Chesapeake Bay Pleasure Boat unused pair of stickers for vessel.

 

 

Massachusetts Archery Stamps

This pictorial set has always been popular with collectors. Although it started relatively early (1960), until fairly recently the Department of Conservation kept a supply of unused remainders on hand to sell collectors. Therefore, the regularly-issued stamps are not very expensive to acquire, even today. In fact, from the prices I have seen, the 1962 and 1966 stamps make for an especially good buy as I know these two were the first to sell out – before I first visited there in the early 1980s.

As I often stayed with friends Will and Abby Csaplar in Massachusetts, it provided me an excellent opportunity to frequent the Department of Conservation Headquarters and get to know the staff. On one of these trips I was introduced to Dan Breen, a former staff artist who was allowed to retain and sell his own original artwork. Fortunately, Dan had held on to a few of his favorite pieces and allowed me to acquire them for my collection and second exhibit.

One series of these pieces illustrates the process involved in selecting the design that was used for two consecutive issues, 1968 and 1969. From the start, Department officials knew they wanted to honor the local Native Americans who originally hunted for deer in the region with a bow and arrow; so Dan’s first design featured a Native American holding a bow, inset within a shield (see figure 7).

 

 

Figure 7. 1968 Massachusetts Archery original art by Dan Breen – the first unaccepted design.

 

 

The officials liked Dan’s shield motif but decided they also wanted him to include a nice big buck in the design; six of the prior eight stamps had included a deer in the design and the series had been popular with collectors and hunters alike. So Dan made the shield smaller, moved it from the center to the right side and added a deer at the left side (see Figure 8).

 

 

Figure 8. 1968 Massachusetts Archery original art by Dan Breen – the second unaccepted design.

 

 

Dan was now on the right track, however, his original deer figure was relatively tiny compared to the shield motif. It also faced away from the viewer. This could make it difficult for some people to discern it was a buck on the finished product (a much smaller stamp). So he was asked to increase the size of the deer and have it face forward. When they saw Dan’s artwork this time, the officials were very pleased and used it for both the 1968 and 1969 Archery Deer Stamps (see Figure 9).

 

 

Figure 9. 1968 Massachusetts Archery original art by Dan Breen –  the accepted design.

 

 

Subsequent to acquiring the original art, I was able to acquire E.L. Vanderford’s vertical pair of 1968 Massachusetts Archery Deer Stamps that was imperforate between, in error. These pieces helped to make for a great page in my second exhibit (see Figure 10).

 

 

Figure 10. A page form my second exhibit.

 

 

New Mexico Hunting & Fishing Licenses

This gallery is the culmination of a significant portion of the time and effort I have put into my hobby. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, when there were a larger number of general hunting and fishing license collectors (each of us trying to acquire at least one license from every year from each territory or state), one of those which presented us with the most difficulty was New Mexico – especially those issued prior to the end of WWII.

One of my friends, the legendary collector Tom Clark of Maryland, had only a half dozen among the over 10,000 licenses in his collection. The rest of us had half that – combined.

At some point I decided to take this on as another personal challenge. I figured it would make for, perhaps, the ultimate fish and game thrill-of-the-hunt adventure. So I started making frequent trips to New Mexico (once or twice a year, often accompanied by Kay or Eric), ran continuous ads in the Albuquerque Journal and the Santa Fe New Mexican – and basically let everyone know that I was willing to pay top dollar for any New Mexico license I could use for my collection.

While I have put in a lot of time and effort – I have also had a couple of big breaks along the way. One day Tom, finally starting to slow down, decided to sell me his entire collection of paper and cloth licenses (it took seven years to pay it off). Then, in 1997, an amazing thing happened.

I had a booth at Pacific ’97, arguably the greatest International Stamp Show and Philatelic Exhibition ever held in the United States. A midwest dealer had recently acquired a large run of New Mexico licenses, starting with the first Territorial issue in 1909 (see figure 11) and continuing through 1958, the year I was born. They were all from one owner, Leslie L. Langley.

 

 

Figure 11. 1909 Territory of New Mexico $1.50 Hunter’s License issued to Leslie Langley.

 

 

He had seen my ads in the philatelic press and knew I would be at Pacific ’97. When he brought all of Langley’s early New Mexico licenses to my booth – over twice as many as Tom Clark and I had collected over decades of trying really hard – I could not believe my own eyes. There were a total of 23 issued prior to the end of the war!

In addition to being a life-long hunter, Leslie Langley was very involved in Wildlife Conservation. He was a member of the Santa Fe Game Protective Association for many years and eventually became a State Game Warden (see Figures 12 and 13). However, in my book, Leslie will be remembered as a far-sighted protector of New Mexico’s early Hunting and fishing licensing heritage and history.

 

 

Figure 12. Leslie Langley’s Santa Fe Game Protective Association card.

 

 

Figure 13. Leslie Langley became a New Mexico Game Warden in 1952.

 

 

On January 6, 1912, New Mexico became a state. That year they printed and issued two types of licenses; the first was similar to the Territorial issues (with the exception that it was non pictorial) in that it was printed with lines to fill in the appropriate license fee and species. The second was a General Hunting License with the $1.50 Fee printed (see Figures 13 and 14).

 

 

Figure 13. 1912 State of New Mexico $1.50 [General] Hunting License issued to Leslie Langley.

 

 

Figure 14. 1912 State of New Mexico General Hunting License.

 

 

For much more detailed information on New Mexico’s early hunting and fishing licenses – and to see more of Leslie Langley’s licenses – see the introduction to the gallery and the gallery itself.

 

 

North Dakota Non Resident Waterfowl Stamps

The North Dakota Non Resident Waterfowl Stamp series has long been a staple of the waterfowl stamp or “duck stamp” hobby. The series were issued over a long period of time, starting in 1975 and ending after the 1992 season.

What makes them so interesting to collectors is that North Dakota required non resident hunters to initially purchase both a waterfowl stamp and a small game stamp – then, in 1983, added a general game stamp to this requirement.

But the real challenge (and fun) is trying to collect all of the different types of non resident waterfowl stamps that were issued during this period – as various hunting scenarios dictated that the stamps be issued in multiple formats.

From 1975 through 1982, things were pretty straightforward; there were two types of non resident waterfowl stamps printed and issued each year. The type most commonly sold to hunters was printed se-tenant with a non resident small game stamp on a peelable backing – with instructions printed in the margins and four duck tags at the right. The serial numbers that were printed on the waterfowl stamp, the small game stamp and the tags all matched. The license agent only wrote in the zone (or county) the stamp was valid in with a pen (see Figure 15).

 

 

Figure 15. Exhibit page showing 1975 North Dakota Non Resident Waterfowl and Non Resident General Game Stamps (with matching serial numbers) used on a ND License. Note the license agent has written a “2” on the line provided on the waterfowl stamp to indicate the valid zone.

 

 

A second type of non resident waterfowl stamp was sold to hunters who had previously purchased a non resident small game stamp for a season that open prior to waterfowl season (Both resident and non resident hunters were only required to purchase one small game stamp per calendar year). These stamps did not have serial numbers printed on them; the license agent wrote in the same number on the waterfowl stamp as was printed on the small game stamp, as well as the zone.

In 1975, stamp collectors did not learn of the North Dakota Non Resident Waterfowl Stamps while they were still valid. Therefore, no unused examples of the stamps with matching numbers have been recorded.

After the season was over (and all the stamps with matching numbers had already been destroyed) E.L. Vanderford was made aware of the stamps and persuaded the the License Section Supervisor to make unused remainders available to collectors. They found a box containing unnumbered 1975 non resident stamps and so this type, only, entered the collector market.

Starting in 1976, the License Supervisor ordered that a quantity of se-tenant non resident waterfowl and small game stamps with matching numbers be cut out of their backing (with scissors) following the end of each waterfowl season and these unused remainders were made available to stamp collectors through 1982, after which time the format was changed (see Figure 16).

 

 

Figure 16. 1976 North Dakota Non Resident Waterfowl Stamp se-tenant with Non Resident Small Game Stamp, unused.

 

 

For detailed information on the various formats from 1983 through 2002, see the introduction to the gallery and the gallery itself. To gain a complete understanding for how these interesting stamps were produced and used, it is suggested you also refer to the introductions and galleries for the North Dakota Non Resident Small Game Stamps within Gallery Eight.

I would like to make one thing very clear. To many people, the unused duck and goose tags that were issued through 1982 very closely resemble the non resident waterfowl stamps, themselves (see Figure 17).

 

 

Figure 17. 1976 North Dakota Duck Tags, complete pane.

 

 

While these tags are very collectible as collateral material and they do have some monetary value – it is important to understand they are not some kind of rare non pictorial waterfowl stamp.

 

 

Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamps &

Utah Lake Powell Fishing Stamps

Starting in 1964, Utah began to issue two different series of semi pictorial fishing stamps. One was required of Wyoming sportsmen intending to fish on the Utah portion of the Flaming Gorge Reservoir and the other was required of both resident and non resident sportsmen fishing on Lake Powell.

The Flaming Gorge Reservoir is located primarily in Wyoming and partially in northeastern Utah. It was created by constructing the Flaming Gorge Dam on the Green River. Construction began in 1958 and was completed in 1964 (see Figure 18). When finished, the reservoir was 91 miles long and covered 42,000 acres.

 

 

Figure 18. Flaming Gorge Dam and Reservoir.

 

 

A wide variety of fish species may be harvested at Flaming Gorge; rainbow trout have been stocked annually since the reservoir’s completion and Kokanee Salmon and smallmouth bass were stocked in the mid 1960s and have since reproduced naturally. In addition, brown trout and channel catfish have occasionally been stocked and lake trout or “mackinaw” have found their way into the reservoir via the upper Green River drainage.

The Utah and Wyoming Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamps arose from a reciprocal agreement between the Utah and Wyoming Fish and Game Commissions. Wyoming residents intending to fish on the Utah portion of the lake are required to first purchase a Utah Flaming Gorge stamp and affix it to their license – and visa versa:

 

The Flaming Gorge Reservoir Agreement

“This agreement is hereby entered into this 28th Day of August, 1963 between the Utah Fish and Game Commission, hereinafter called the UTAH COMMISSION, and the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission, hereinafter called the WYOMING COMMISSION. This agreement shall remain in full force and effect from this date until terminated by either party upon sixty (60) days written notice to the other party.

“WHEREAS , the WYOMING COMMISSION and the UTAH COMMISSION have made investigations relating to the licensing, seasons, bag limits and other pertinent regulations governing the taking of fish from the waters of the Flaming Gorge Reservoir within the states of Wyoming and Utah; and,

“WHEREAS it is deemed to be in the best interest of public fishing in the waters of Flaming Gorge Reservoir for the Commissions of both states to establish mutual regulations governing fishing in these waters; and,

“WHEREAS, it is necessary and advisable to have an agreement concerning the enacting of such regulations for the proper conservation and management of the fishery resources in these waters;

“NOW, THEREFORE, the UTAH COMMISSION and the WYOMING COMMISSION by virtue of the authority granted to them by law, do hereby mutually covenant and agree, as follows:

“I. A person having in possession a valid Wyoming fishing license must have in his possession a Utah Fishing Stamps ($2.00) to fish in the Utah part of Flaming Gorge Reservoir. A person having in possession a valid Utah fishing license must have in his possession a Wyoming Fishing Stamp ($2.00) to fish in the Wyoming portion of Flaming Gorge Reservoir.”

“IV. The fishing stamps, when accompanied by a proper license (in those situations where a license is required) will allow fishing in any portion of said waters as described and limited above, and will permit fishermen to enter the described waters from any point. The fishing stamps of either state must be signed across the face thereof by the person in possession thereof in the same manner as his name appears on either the Wyoming fishing license or Utah fishing license which he holds (in those situations where a license is required).

V. The fishing stamps shall be valid from January 1 through December 31 of the year of issuance. The issuance and sale of the fishing stamps may be conducted in any manner mutually agreed upon by the Wyoming and Utah Commissions. Each Commission, in its discretion, may establish license dealers in the other state for the purpose of selling licenses and stamps.”

The 1964 Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamps featured an areal view of the dam and reservoir in brown ink with green lettering on tan paper. They were printed in panes of six (2 x 3) with a tab along the left side. The panes were rouletted between the stamps and between the stamps and the tab (see Figure 19).

 

 

Figure 19. 1964 Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamps, complete pane.

 

 

From 1965 through 1967, unused 1964 remainders were employed by overprinting the stamps with the current year date. In 1965, the year was rubber stamped in black or blue ink. In 1966 and 1967, the year was printed in red (see figures 20 and 21).

 

 

Figure 20. 1965 Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamp with black rubber stamp.

 

 

Figure 21. 1966 Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamp.

 

 

From 1968 through 1978, the stamps were very similar, with either the Seal of the Fish and Game Commission or the Great Seal of the State of Utah in the center in the center. The seals were printed in various colors with serial numbers printed in inks that more or less matched the color of the seal.

In 1978, there were two distinct printings; the first was printed with a blue seal and serial number, while the second was printed with a pink seal and red serial number (see Figures 22 and 23).

 

 

Figure 22. Type I 1978 Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamp.

 

 

Figure 22. Type II 1978 Utah Flaming Gorge Fishing Stamp.

 

 

Similar stamps were issued in 1979 (again there were two printings) with the exception that the new Utah Wildlife Resources seal was featured. Starting in 1980, the stamps underwent numerous changes and the classic period for this series came to an end. For more detailed information, see the introduction and gallery.

 

Beautiful Lake Powell is the largest reservoir in Utah and one of the largest in the U.S. It stretches for nearly 186 miles starting from a point two miles south of the Arizona border – all the way to Canyonlands National Park. It was formed by the creation of the Glen Canyon Dam which started in 1956 and was completed in 1966 (see Figures 23 and 24).

 

 

Figure 23. Beautiful Lake Powell, Utah.

 

 

 

Figure 24. Breathtaking scenery at Lake Powell, Utah.

 

 

Many sportsmen feel that Lake Powell is the best place to fish in the western part of the country. Species for harvest include catfish, striped bass, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, sunfish, crappie and walleye.

 

The Lake Powell Agreement

“This memorandum of understanding, pertaining to the waters of Lake Powell and the waters of the Colorado River below Lake Powell to the Marble Canyon damsite [sic] or dam, shall become effective January 1, 1964, and shall remain in effect until terminated by either state upon a sixty (60) day written notice to the other state prior to the end of the calendar year in which notice is given.

“In CONSIDERATION of the mutual promises set forth below, it is hereby agreed as follows:

“I. Any person holding a valid Utah fishing license may fish the waters of Lake Powell formed by Glen Canyon Dam; and any person holding a valid Arizona fishing license may fish such waters when in possession of a Utah Special Use Permit [Stamp].

“II. Any person holding a valid Arizona fishing license may fish the waters of the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and the Marble Canyon damsite [sic] or dam; and any person holding a valid Utah fishing license may fish such waters when in possession of an Arizona Special Use Permit [Stamp].

“III. Children under the age of fourteen (14) years, regardless of the state of residence, shall be permitted to fish Lake Powell and the Colorado river between the Glen Canyon Dam and the Marble Canyon damsite [sic] or dam without a fishing license and without a Special Use Permit [Stamp].

“IV. The Special Use Permits, when accompanied by a proper license… will allow fishing in any portion of said waters as described and limited above, and will permit fishermen to enter the described waters from any point. The Special Use Permits [Stamps} from either state must be signed across the face…”

“V. Arizona Special Use Permits [Stamps] will be $2.00 for Utah residents and $3.00 for Utah nonresidents and Utah Special Use Permits [Stamps] will be $2.00 for Arizona residents and $3.00 for Arizona nonresidents. Utah Special Use Permits [Stamps] will coincide with the Arizona license year and Arizona Special Use Permits [Stamps] will coincide with the Utah license year.

“VI. Each Department, in its discretion, may establish license dealers in the other state for the purpose of selling licenses and Special Use Permits [Stamps].”

The 1964 Utah Lake Powell Fishing Stamps featured the seal of the Utah Fish and Game Commission in light red ink with black lettering on deep yellow paper. They were printed in panes of six (2 x 3) with a tab along the left side. The panes were rouletted between the stamps and between the stamps and the tab (see Figure 25).

 

 

Figure 25. 1964 Utah Resident Lake Powell Fishing Stamps, complete pane.

 

Two stamps were printed and issued each year, one for residents and one for non residents, from 1964 through 1975 with the exception of 1965 and 1966 – when no stamps were printed or issued.

Starting in 1967, the stamps were only required of sportsmen fishing on the areas of the lake which were included inside the Utah border. The 1967 stamps featured the seal for The Great State of Utah in blue ink on white matte paper. The year date was not printed on the stamps, in error.

The 1967 year date was applied with a rubber stamp, using black and blue inks. At least one resident stamp has been recorded with the year date missing. It is in used condition and has been removed from a license. A relatively small number of non resident stamps have been recorded with the serial number missing in unused condition (see Figures 26 – 28).

 

 

Figure 26. 1967 Utah Resident Lake Powell Fishing Stamp with black rubber stamp.

 

 

Figure 27. 1967 Utah Resident Lake Powell Fishing Stamp with missing serial number (used).

 

 

Figure 28. Utah Non Resident Lake Powell Fishing Stamp, complete pane with missing serial numbers -– ex Pruess.

 

 

From 1968 through 1979, the Lake Powell Fishing Stamps were very similar to those Utah printed for the Flaming Gorge Reservoir – see the introduction and gallery for detailed information. It should be noted that after 1975, stamps were only required to be purchased by resident sportsmen.

These two series are difficult to complete today, as not many pioneer collectors were aware of them prior to Vanderford’s Handbook being published in 1973. By this point, most of the earlier stamps were no longer available.

 

 

Continue to Part Two

 

 

 

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