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The Dean of Minnesota’s Wildlife Artists – Part Four

Today we shall take a detailed look at the 1967-68 federal duck stamp and print. This was Les Kouba’s second federal win and it also happens to be one of my favorite duck stamps. For Les, the stamp cemented his status as one of the most influential artists in the duck stamp program’s history. As for myself, as far back as I…

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The Dean of Minnesota’s Wildlife Artists – Part Three

In today’s post we shall continue discussing the career of Les Kouba. We will learn about his relationship with fellow artist Edward Morris and see more of how prominently Cornelius Bartels figured into the careers of both men. If the name Edward Morris sounds familiar, it should be. Ed Morris was a fine artist in his…

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The Dean of Minnesota’s Wildlife Artists – Part Two

When we last left off, Les Kouba had recently opened American Wildlife Art Galleries and was enjoying all that 1950s post-war prosperity had to offer a talented, hard-working individual with a head for business. By 1957, Les had already been receiving notices from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for several years informing him about the annual…

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The Dean of Minnesota’s Wildlife Artists – Part One

Today we shall start to look at the career of Les Kouba, one of the more memorable artists from a state which has heavily influenced the wildlife art scene since the late 1930s. Les was not a stereotypical artist. They say that the artist’s mind generally makes for a poor businessmen; such was not the case with Les Kouba.…

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From Girlie Pulps to Trout Stamps – Part Six

In the conclusion to this series, we will finish looking at the trout stamps Worth designed for the Tennessee Game and Fish Commission. We will see one of his gems, then take a close look at the 1962-63 design and end with a revealing discussion regarding the 1963-64 issue. In the Handbook of Fish and Game Stamps, E.L. Vanderford stated…

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From Girlie Pulps to Trout Stamps – Part Five

We have now reached the apex of Worth B. Carnahan’s career as an artist and designer – the Tennessee Trout stamps. Trout stamps are one of the most popular categories of fish and game stamps, second perhaps, only to the venerable waterfowl stamps. Of all the trout stamps issued in the U.S., those designed by Worth from 1957 to 1963 are among of the…

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From Girlie Pulps to Trout Stamps – Part Four

Today we will start to take a look at the Tennessee fish and game stamps that were designed by Worth B. Carnahan. We will see essays, proofs, regularly issued stamps, errors and usages from the collections of Morton Dean Joyce, Les Lebo, E.L. Vanderford and David Curtis – as well as new discoveries from The Carnahan…

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From Girlie Pulps to Trout Stamps – Part Three

In today’s post, we follow the Carnahan family to Nashville. It is in Nashville, while working for the Tennessee Game and Fish Commission, that Worth finally realizes his childhood dream and he becomes a real stamp designer. Unlike other staff artists, Worth B. Carnahan does not design your typical fish and game stamps – his stamps are special.  …

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From Girlie Pulps to Trout Stamps – Part Two

Today we look at Worth B. Carnahan’s contributions to the Golden Age of comics, focussing on some of his many stamp features. When we last left off, Worth had rejoined Adolphie Barreaux’s Studio in 1937. In 1938, Harry Donenfeld had moved the Studio into his company headquarters on Lexington Avenue while he attempted to consolidate all the…

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From Girlie Pulps to Trout Stamps – Part One

Today we will start to look at the career of Worth B. Carnahan. Worth was an artist, illustrator, magazine editor and publisher. He participated in the origins of two pop culture mainstays, girlie pulps and comic books, whose images today invoke two very different connotations. We shall see how the development of both industries was directly linked and,…

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